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Anti-Bullying Laws: Are they really protecting your children?

Bullying has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. It’s a sad reality that our children have come to face. It seems too often that I hear tragic stories about kids who have been bullied. One would think as the prevalence of bullying increases, anti-bullying laws would be strengthened. However, in some states this logic doesn’t exist.

Katy Butler, now a junior at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor Michigan, has been a victim of bullying in the past. Katy suffered from harsh name-calling, pushing and shoving, and getting her locker slammed shut on her hand causing one of her fingers to break. Katy endured these incidents alone because she was afraid her school wouldn’t do anything to help. Katy feared if she told people about the bullying, it would get worse. Katy’s friend, Carson Borbely, was also repeatedly harassed in school and no help was provided for him either.

Just last week, the Michigan State Senate passed a new anti-bullying bill that is supposed to protect students, but just how much does it? Special language was added to the bill that basically gives bullies protection instead of the victims. This language indicates that bullying because of “a sincerely held religious belief or moral conviction” is acceptable. Now children know the loopholes of bullying and how to get away with it.

Outraged by this anti-bullying bill, Katy and Carson created a petition on Change.org to stop the “License to Bully” bill. More than 39,000 people have already signed the petition, which demands a stricter anti-bullying law to be passed. Nobody should get away with bullying for any reason. Sign the petition so no one else has to suffer. Students deserve better protection.

3 Comments

  1. As Matt’s father let me shine a little light on the larger issue. Matt was basicallt assaulted because upperclassmen were given the “right” to haze him as an underclassmen, because no adults said not to. Reports noting it was an anti-gay incident have been grossly mis-reported as Matt was not gay, nor was the assault motivated by that. MI schools were asked in 2001 to develop policies on the issue of bullying. Schools are just now getting around to it. This is why legislation is needed to tell schools they “must” take action on this issue and no longer “suggest” that they do it.

    I have talked with students, teachers, law enforcement officers across the stae and have traveled to Washington to talk with national experts on this issue and it is the #2 issue for schools right after funding. Bullying impacts every sector of our schools: grades, truancy, drop out rates, test scores and on and on.

    Will the law itself protect your child? No, but it will give both the student and the parent more ground to stand on when issues do arise. Both will be able to ask the school how they are complying with the law. A significant difference in years past. And a large part of that change will be the students themselves.

    Like these young ladies they will be the ones who make the change, because I have seen it happen. Schools who take the situation seriously and enlist the students will be those schools that change the most in the shortest period of time. Anti-bullying is a community effort and that is why these young ladies made an impact everyone ( seemingly except our lawmakers) are tired of the daily bullying

    Just like a seatbelt law requiring us to “buckle-up”, it only works when we actually do the work.

    Reply
  2. Keri Nicholas

    My son who is 7 and in first grade is being bullied. Now to my understanding that is given to me by the Principal that there is a law that protects the bully. I want to know what is gonna happen to the child that is bullying my son. She wont inform me what the name of the law is and just keeps saying its a Michigan law. I’ve looked all over the internet for this and yet cant find anything concerning this matter. Could someone please help me. Thank You

    Keri Nicholas

    Reply
  3. Dylan Bodan

    When I was bullied i just kicked the other kids *** Tell your kid to tell these kids to go away and leave him alone and they will be too afraid to hurt him and leave him alone. Bullies are just scared because of their own insecurities

    Reply

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